Motivation

24 June 2014

Pick it up.

Pick it up.

A few months ago a young Outpost Athlete gave us the gift of sharing an essay she wrote on the subject of her personal motivation.  We were honored to read her eloquent words.  With her consent, we share them now with you.

 

“We know you are a talented student; what motivates you to be a good learner and to put forth your best effort?

It lies hidden. Away. Stored far from the prying eyes of critics, from the grasping hands that want to dig into my secrets, the one thing that I could not bear to be seen torn down or tormented because of. Something I dare not bring to my lips and into the ears of those who seek to mock anything they dislike. Something I wish to cocoon, keep to myself, let it be my personal motivation.

What could be so precious, so close to my heart that I feel the need to hide it away for security? What is it?  Why do I deliberately avoid talking about what motivates me to go on?

It’s the place where I have grown the most, the place where flaws and mistakes are welcomed to help us mend, to fix and to continue to improve. A place where I can run away to when I need to help myself forget the worst times in life, where people are encouraged to open themselves up and interact with one another. A place where community and communication matters more than results.

A gym, simply put, is not usually structured that way. A typical example has machines, stations, and different equipment meant to work different parts of your body. People arrive at different times, either alone or with a buddy, and focus solely on themselves. They carry no interest in what the others may be doing, choosing to regard each other’s presence only through small nods or slight smiles. Where people with weak confidences feel exposed, watched, and judged.

Which is why I love Outpost CrossFit. A type of gym that CrossFitters would refer to as a “Box” that is very rigorous and demands much of your effort. It will break your weaknesses, help you surpass the limits that defeated the old, weak you that existed before. Despite the intensity, it does not consist of machinery that will work your body for you. Rather, it requires athletes to use their own body, their own strength, to complete the workouts. And the best part is that the coaches are unlike the stereotypical trainer that shouts out demands or twitches whenever you fail to do things correctly. Instead, they help you see the mistakes in your form and technique, give you advice on how to perfect it to prevent any injuries. They encourage you, they clap and they motivate you when you are the last one struggling to finish, give you the extra push you need to get through the workout. They understand your limits and work with what you can do to get the same feeling of accomplishment, to push past your capacities.

Outpost proved to me that failure was actually a pretty good thing. “First of all, it shows that you’re pushing yourself. Second, you can learn from this experience. And third, it gives you something to improve, a goal to accomplish.” These words from the Head Coach have remained with me as a reminder to do my best, that no matter what the outcome may be, what counts is the effort you put to succeed.”

It was there where my motivation was found. It was there when I finally found something to work for, to strive for, to achieve. My first steps inside were reluctant, my cold feet pressed against the leather straps of my sandals as I softly walked on, careful to not let the soles of my shoes slap loudly against the floor. I shrunk beside the coach, silently observing the other athletes interact with one another. Noticing the amount of weight they worked with. My initial thought was I don’t belong here. I’m too weak.

That lack of confidence was my biggest restrain. The little faith I had in myself was not enough to help me voice out my thoughts. The low amount of value I placed on myself choked up any possible accomplishments before they could ripen. I was my own cage, I created my own prison, I deliberately destroyed any opportunity I had to succeed. Too afraid to fail in front of others and become the pathetic laughing stock that couldn’t.

Outpost proved to me that failure was actually a pretty good thing. “First of all, it shows that you’re pushing yourself. Second, you can learn from this experience. And third, it gives you something to improve, a goal to accomplish.” These words from the Head Coach have remained with me as a reminder to do my best, that no matter what the outcome may be, what counts is the effort you put to succeed.”

-Ashley Carvajal, 15

25 June 2014

Split Snatch
WU: 5-5-3: @40%
WS: 5-5-5 @40, 50, 60%

WOD:  3/5 RNFT (55/95#)
8 OHS
9 Split Jerk
10 Hang Clean

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